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The Road to Recovery, a Journey of Hope

Phillies' Dickie Noles addresses Journey of Hope Project participants before the Phillies game Sept. 21, 2017.

By Monica Lewis-Wilborn

April 9, 1983.
This was the day Dickie Noles’ life changed. A Major League Baseball player with a nasty 95 mph fastball, Noles was a beast on the mound. But an addiction to drugs and alcohol was spiraling his life out of control as fast as his pitches. Multiple arrests for disorderly conduct were the norm for Noles, leading to far too many nights in jail and away from the baseball field.

And on that day – April 9, 1983 – Noles decided enough was enough. He hasn’t used drugs or had an alcoholic drink since then and life, Noles said, has never been better or more under control.

“The best part of being in recovery is knowing that I’m in control of my life, not the alcohol or drugs,” Noles said, speaking with a group of men from the Journey of Hope Project just behind home plate at Citizens Bank Park. The Phillies extended an invitation to Journey of Hope to meet Noles and stay for the team’s Businessperson’s Special against the Los Angeles Dodgers on Sept. 21 in recognition of Recovery Month.

The Journey of Hope Project is a collaboration between several innovative long-term residential treatment programs designed to serve individuals experiencing prolonged homelessness, substance use disorders, and co-occurring mental health challenges. It is able to admit individuals directly from the street, shelters, and Safe Havens by reducing barriers to treatment admission. Upon completion of treatment, individuals are connected with permanent supportive housing opportunities, as well as ongoing outreach and follow-up to help support long-term sustained recovery in the community.

While Noles, now an employee assistance professional with the Phillies, never experienced homelessness like the men he met with, he knows all too well of the struggles one faces when substances control their life. Now that he himself is in recovery, he enjoys nothing more than sharing his story and helping others get access to the treatment and services designed to help them leave a life led by substances behind. He works closely with players and offers insight to help them steer clear of the dangers of substance misuse.

During the hour he spent with the Journey of Hope Project participants, Noles talked baseball, sharing stories of his interactions with legends like Pete Rose, Mike Schmidt, and Rickey Henderson, and giving hitting and pitching tips. But he also encouraged the group to celebrate the victory of getting sober and working hard to stay that way. William Alba hasn’t used any substances for 35 days, a small number compared to Noles’ 35 years, but Noles encouraged Alba, saying they are in the every same place.

“Today is the only day that matters for you,” Noles said before hugging Alba. “Just take it one day at a time.”

Alba, 46, has misused substances for 31 years. Originally from Puerto Rico, he moved around to several cities when he moved to U.S. before stopping in Philadelphia in 2006. He had been in and out of homeless shelters and now believes that this time will stick.

“I’m learning how to take control of my actions and live a better life,” Alba said. “I started as a child with marijuana then on to cocaine, alcohol and heroin. I lost control and I lost everything. Now, I want to do what’s best to get my life back.”

Following their time with Noles, the Journey of Hope Project participants were treated to great seats to watch the Phillies in action. It was the first game at Citizens Bank Park for them and an opportunity to have fun after some very challenging times.

If you or someone you know is ready to get on the road to recovery, DBHIDS is ready to help. Call our behavioral Health Special Initiative (BHSI) at 215-546-1200 or the Philadelphia recovery Community Center at 215-223-7700. For more information on recovery support, please visit dbhids.org.

Philly Offers Free Training on Use of Narcan

By Alicia Vitarelli

PHILADELPHIA (WPVI) — Officials call it nothing short of a lifesaver, and Wednesday city officials offered anyone who lives in Philadelphia free training on how to use Narcan.

Narcan is the brand name of the drug used to reverse the effects of an opioid overdose.

Overdoses are skyrocketing and officials want everyone to have the tools and skills to save a life.

The city’s behavioral health department offered education about the epidemic, the drug and access to Narcan. They also gave a hands on demonstration on how to administer Narcan. The goal was simple: combating the crisis one person at a time.

“A lot of people are faced with this crisis in their own households,” said Pamela McClenton of the Department of Behavioral Health. “This is a way for us to destigmatize the opioid substance use disorder and treatment.”

Narcan can be purchased over-the-counter at drug stores in Philadelphia, you do not need a prescription.

Officials said it can reverse a fatal overdose almost immediately, and restore breathing within two to eight minutes.

Kennedy Health in Berlin, Camden County is tackling the opioid epidemic in New Jersey.

Medical experts spent the day discussing the crisis and the efforts to fight it.

U-S Congressman Donald Norcross was the opening speaker and Tony Luke, the cheesesteak franchise founder, shared his emotional story after his son recently died from a heroin overdose.

Fighting the War Against Opioid Addiction with Narcan

PHILADELPHIA, PA (WTXF) – As the country continues to grapple with the opioid epidemic, many view overdose reversal medication as an essential tool to fight back.

Some counselors, like Rick Tull of Philadelphia’s Office of Behavioral Health, believe making these drugs more accessible deserves consideration.

“With all the people who passed, including the three people who passed in Philadelphia last night, I think it’s appropriate to have a moment of silence,” he says.

Wednesday was one in a series of events hosted by the city to get the message out that residents must be prepared to save a life when the moment calls for it. Participants heard Tull present the staggering statistics.

“Every day, 100 people will die from opioid overdoses nationwide, [with] at least three to four in Philadelphia alone,” he said.

But it honestly wasn’t the stats that made the biggest impact, it was the attendees..

Elvis Rosado works in addiction prevention and demonstrated Narcan because he knows firsthand its impact.

“The agency staff has reversed over 200 people. By myself, as of last week, I’m at 37 people,” he told FOX 29’s Bill Anderson.

Onzie Travis is a counselor who shocked attendees with his sincerity when he explained only one person he worked with died from drug use.

“Some people I’ve worked with have overdosed,” he said. “Fortunately, only one of them passed away. The others were revived.”

Health worker Allison Herens administered Narcan following a training session less than 24 hours after purchasing it.

“I purchased Narcan the day before, and when I got to Somerset Station a man on the platform overdosed and I reversed him,” she said.

Whether making Narcan more accessible makes users more likely to continue abusing opioids, the training sessions made a simple point clear. While we debate the merits of these overdose reversal drugs, we should save lives while we do it.

Thousands Expected for 17th Annual Recovery Walk in Philadelphia

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — With the opioid epidemic expected to claim more than a thousand lives in Philadelphia, this year, nearly 30,000 people are expected to gather at Penn’s Landing, on Saturday, to show there is hope for addicts in the 17th annual “Recovery Walk.”

Raquel will be walking, though it seemed unlikely until 13-months-ago.

“Alcohol, heroin, methamphetamine, xanax, crack cocaine, they were my drugs of choice and it landed me in prison,” she said.

Prison proved to be the bottom, the motivation to get sober and now that she is, she wants others to know.

“You don’t have to stay in that darkness forever,” she said. Recovery is possible and it does work.”

It used to be hard to get recovered addicts to come out to such a public event, says organizer Bev Haberle.

“Our first walk had a hundred people in it,” she said.

Haberle says the ever-growing turn-out is a sign of the decreasing stigma.

“It has really helped people feel pride in recovery, she explained.

That includes Raquel.

“I’m happy that I’m in a position to be part of the solution because I was part of the problem for a long time.”

The walk begins at 9 a.m. and goes to Independence Historic Park with post-walk festivities at the Great Plaza till 1:30 in the afternoon.

Covering the Opiate Epidemic

Amid the national outcry over an epidemic of opiate addictions and overdoses, and loud new debates over access to, coverage for and efficacy of medical and behavioral treatments, many journalists find themselves covering opiates more than ever before — and trying to develop new ways to pitch stories about substance use disorders. To help journalists and news organizations improve their coverage of all aspects of the current opiate crisis — and take more modern approaches to the age-old stories in substance use — WHYY is organizing a free two-day workshop “Covering the Opiate Epidemic.” The workshop is funded by the Thomas Scattergood Behavioral Health Foundation. WHYY has had a dedicated behavioral health reporter since 2008, and has established itself as a leading newsroom in terms of covering mental health.

The workshop will take place Nov. 18 and 19, at WHYY in Philadelphia, and will feature a range of local and national substance use disorder and mental health policy experts, researchers, as well as award-winning journalists who have covered this epidemic in-depth.

The first day of the workshop, Friday, Nov. 18, provides an immersion into the medical, scientific, political and social issues and trends involved in the opiate epidemic. Speakers include: Roland Lamb, Deputy Commissioner, Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disability Services; Dr. Leana Wen, Commissioner of Health, Baltimore City; Dr. Carlos Blanco, Director of the Division of Epidemiology, Services and Prevention Research at the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA); Joshua D. Lee MD, MSc, Associate Professor in Medicine and Psychiatry; Kathleen Myers, Ph.D, Treatment Research Institute; and Michael A. Ashburn, MD, MPH, MBA.

For further information, call 215-928-2459 during regular business hours, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., or email cslotman@whyy.org.

Assessments Centers and Crisis Response Centers in Philadelphia

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  • Search Results for "" Query

Assessments Centers and Crisis Response Centers in Philadelphia

Below is a map listing locations with Behavioral Assessment Centers (BAC), listed in blue, and Crisis Response Centers (CRC), listed in green. Facilities with both BAC and CRC services are listed in yellow. The BACs serve as a point of entry for mental health and addiction recovery programs and determine which level and type of care best meets the needs of people with substance use histories and challenges based on the Pennsylvania Client Placement Criteria (PCPC) assessment guidelines. The CRCs treat people experiencing emergency behavioral health crisis with psychiatric coverage 24-hours a day, seven days a week and are available to all people, regardless of health insurance coverage or ability to pay, in a safe and secure environment.

If you would like to see only BACs or only CRC facilities, click the following icon on the Google Map:
GoogleIcon
This will allow you to select which type of facility you would like to view.

Assessments Centers and Crisis Response Centers

For those seeking service, it is recommended that you have ID in order to expedite admission and assessment.

DBHIDS Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day Art Show

DBHIDS is recognizing all children and youth artists receiving supports from Philadelphia’s children’s behavioral health community. These talented children and youth who live with mental illness, addiction and intellectual disability are sharing their artistic gifts with us all.

The Opening Celebration is May 2 at 1 p.m. featuring speakers and youth performers. Speakers include:

  • Dr. Arthur C. Evans, Commissioner of DBHIDS
  • Joan Erney, Chief Executive Officer, Community Behavioral Health
  • Denise Taylor Patterson, Director of Intellectual disAbility Services, DBHIDS

The Art Exhibit will run from May 2-10, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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The Road to Recovery, a Journey of Hope

Phillies' Dickie Noles addresses Journey of Hope Project participants before the Phillies game Sept. 21, 2017.

By Monica Lewis-Wilborn

April 9, 1983.
This was the day Dickie Noles’ life changed. A Major League Baseball player with a nasty 95 mph fastball, Noles was a beast on the mound. But an addiction to drugs and alcohol was spiraling his life out of control as fast as his pitches. Multiple arrests for disorderly conduct were the norm for Noles, leading to far too many nights in jail and away from the baseball field.

And on that day – April 9, 1983 – Noles decided enough was enough. He hasn’t used drugs or had an alcoholic drink since then and life, Noles said, has never been better or more under control.

“The best part of being in recovery is knowing that I’m in control of my life, not the alcohol or drugs,” Noles said, speaking with a group of men from the Journey of Hope Project just behind home plate at Citizens Bank Park. The Phillies extended an invitation to Journey of Hope to meet Noles and stay for the team’s Businessperson’s Special against the Los Angeles Dodgers on Sept. 21 in recognition of Recovery Month.

The Journey of Hope Project is a collaboration between several innovative long-term residential treatment programs designed to serve individuals experiencing prolonged homelessness, substance use disorders, and co-occurring mental health challenges. It is able to admit individuals directly from the street, shelters, and Safe Havens by reducing barriers to treatment admission. Upon completion of treatment, individuals are connected with permanent supportive housing opportunities, as well as ongoing outreach and follow-up to help support long-term sustained recovery in the community.

While Noles, now an employee assistance professional with the Phillies, never experienced homelessness like the men he met with, he knows all too well of the struggles one faces when substances control their life. Now that he himself is in recovery, he enjoys nothing more than sharing his story and helping others get access to the treatment and services designed to help them leave a life led by substances behind. He works closely with players and offers insight to help them steer clear of the dangers of substance misuse.

During the hour he spent with the Journey of Hope Project participants, Noles talked baseball, sharing stories of his interactions with legends like Pete Rose, Mike Schmidt, and Rickey Henderson, and giving hitting and pitching tips. But he also encouraged the group to celebrate the victory of getting sober and working hard to stay that way. William Alba hasn’t used any substances for 35 days, a small number compared to Noles’ 35 years, but Noles encouraged Alba, saying they are in the every same place.

“Today is the only day that matters for you,” Noles said before hugging Alba. “Just take it one day at a time.”

Alba, 46, has misused substances for 31 years. Originally from Puerto Rico, he moved around to several cities when he moved to U.S. before stopping in Philadelphia in 2006. He had been in and out of homeless shelters and now believes that this time will stick.

“I’m learning how to take control of my actions and live a better life,” Alba said. “I started as a child with marijuana then on to cocaine, alcohol and heroin. I lost control and I lost everything. Now, I want to do what’s best to get my life back.”

Following their time with Noles, the Journey of Hope Project participants were treated to great seats to watch the Phillies in action. It was the first game at Citizens Bank Park for them and an opportunity to have fun after some very challenging times.

If you or someone you know is ready to get on the road to recovery, DBHIDS is ready to help. Call our behavioral Health Special Initiative (BHSI) at 215-546-1200 or the Philadelphia recovery Community Center at 215-223-7700. For more information on recovery support, please visit dbhids.org.

Philly Offers Free Training on Use of Narcan

By Alicia Vitarelli

PHILADELPHIA (WPVI) — Officials call it nothing short of a lifesaver, and Wednesday city officials offered anyone who lives in Philadelphia free training on how to use Narcan.

Narcan is the brand name of the drug used to reverse the effects of an opioid overdose.

Overdoses are skyrocketing and officials want everyone to have the tools and skills to save a life.

The city’s behavioral health department offered education about the epidemic, the drug and access to Narcan. They also gave a hands on demonstration on how to administer Narcan. The goal was simple: combating the crisis one person at a time.

“A lot of people are faced with this crisis in their own households,” said Pamela McClenton of the Department of Behavioral Health. “This is a way for us to destigmatize the opioid substance use disorder and treatment.”

Narcan can be purchased over-the-counter at drug stores in Philadelphia, you do not need a prescription.

Officials said it can reverse a fatal overdose almost immediately, and restore breathing within two to eight minutes.

Kennedy Health in Berlin, Camden County is tackling the opioid epidemic in New Jersey.

Medical experts spent the day discussing the crisis and the efforts to fight it.

U-S Congressman Donald Norcross was the opening speaker and Tony Luke, the cheesesteak franchise founder, shared his emotional story after his son recently died from a heroin overdose.

Fighting the War Against Opioid Addiction with Narcan

PHILADELPHIA, PA (WTXF) – As the country continues to grapple with the opioid epidemic, many view overdose reversal medication as an essential tool to fight back.

Some counselors, like Rick Tull of Philadelphia’s Office of Behavioral Health, believe making these drugs more accessible deserves consideration.

“With all the people who passed, including the three people who passed in Philadelphia last night, I think it’s appropriate to have a moment of silence,” he says.

Wednesday was one in a series of events hosted by the city to get the message out that residents must be prepared to save a life when the moment calls for it. Participants heard Tull present the staggering statistics.

“Every day, 100 people will die from opioid overdoses nationwide, [with] at least three to four in Philadelphia alone,” he said.

But it honestly wasn’t the stats that made the biggest impact, it was the attendees..

Elvis Rosado works in addiction prevention and demonstrated Narcan because he knows firsthand its impact.

“The agency staff has reversed over 200 people. By myself, as of last week, I’m at 37 people,” he told FOX 29’s Bill Anderson.

Onzie Travis is a counselor who shocked attendees with his sincerity when he explained only one person he worked with died from drug use.

“Some people I’ve worked with have overdosed,” he said. “Fortunately, only one of them passed away. The others were revived.”

Health worker Allison Herens administered Narcan following a training session less than 24 hours after purchasing it.

“I purchased Narcan the day before, and when I got to Somerset Station a man on the platform overdosed and I reversed him,” she said.

Whether making Narcan more accessible makes users more likely to continue abusing opioids, the training sessions made a simple point clear. While we debate the merits of these overdose reversal drugs, we should save lives while we do it.

Thousands Expected for 17th Annual Recovery Walk in Philadelphia

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — With the opioid epidemic expected to claim more than a thousand lives in Philadelphia, this year, nearly 30,000 people are expected to gather at Penn’s Landing, on Saturday, to show there is hope for addicts in the 17th annual “Recovery Walk.”

Raquel will be walking, though it seemed unlikely until 13-months-ago.

“Alcohol, heroin, methamphetamine, xanax, crack cocaine, they were my drugs of choice and it landed me in prison,” she said.

Prison proved to be the bottom, the motivation to get sober and now that she is, she wants others to know.

“You don’t have to stay in that darkness forever,” she said. Recovery is possible and it does work.”

It used to be hard to get recovered addicts to come out to such a public event, says organizer Bev Haberle.

“Our first walk had a hundred people in it,” she said.

Haberle says the ever-growing turn-out is a sign of the decreasing stigma.

“It has really helped people feel pride in recovery, she explained.

That includes Raquel.

“I’m happy that I’m in a position to be part of the solution because I was part of the problem for a long time.”

The walk begins at 9 a.m. and goes to Independence Historic Park with post-walk festivities at the Great Plaza till 1:30 in the afternoon.

Covering the Opiate Epidemic

Amid the national outcry over an epidemic of opiate addictions and overdoses, and loud new debates over access to, coverage for and efficacy of medical and behavioral treatments, many journalists find themselves covering opiates more than ever before — and trying to develop new ways to pitch stories about substance use disorders. To help journalists and news organizations improve their coverage of all aspects of the current opiate crisis — and take more modern approaches to the age-old stories in substance use — WHYY is organizing a free two-day workshop “Covering the Opiate Epidemic.” The workshop is funded by the Thomas Scattergood Behavioral Health Foundation. WHYY has had a dedicated behavioral health reporter since 2008, and has established itself as a leading newsroom in terms of covering mental health.

The workshop will take place Nov. 18 and 19, at WHYY in Philadelphia, and will feature a range of local and national substance use disorder and mental health policy experts, researchers, as well as award-winning journalists who have covered this epidemic in-depth.

The first day of the workshop, Friday, Nov. 18, provides an immersion into the medical, scientific, political and social issues and trends involved in the opiate epidemic. Speakers include: Roland Lamb, Deputy Commissioner, Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disability Services; Dr. Leana Wen, Commissioner of Health, Baltimore City; Dr. Carlos Blanco, Director of the Division of Epidemiology, Services and Prevention Research at the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA); Joshua D. Lee MD, MSc, Associate Professor in Medicine and Psychiatry; Kathleen Myers, Ph.D, Treatment Research Institute; and Michael A. Ashburn, MD, MPH, MBA.

For further information, call 215-928-2459 during regular business hours, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., or email cslotman@whyy.org.

Assessments Centers and Crisis Response Centers in Philadelphia

  • Home
  • Search Results for "" Query

Assessments Centers and Crisis Response Centers in Philadelphia

Below is a map listing locations with Behavioral Assessment Centers (BAC), listed in blue, and Crisis Response Centers (CRC), listed in green. Facilities with both BAC and CRC services are listed in yellow. The BACs serve as a point of entry for mental health and addiction recovery programs and determine which level and type of care best meets the needs of people with substance use histories and challenges based on the Pennsylvania Client Placement Criteria (PCPC) assessment guidelines. The CRCs treat people experiencing emergency behavioral health crisis with psychiatric coverage 24-hours a day, seven days a week and are available to all people, regardless of health insurance coverage or ability to pay, in a safe and secure environment.

If you would like to see only BACs or only CRC facilities, click the following icon on the Google Map:
GoogleIcon
This will allow you to select which type of facility you would like to view.

Assessments Centers and Crisis Response Centers

For those seeking service, it is recommended that you have ID in order to expedite admission and assessment.

DBHIDS Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day Art Show

DBHIDS is recognizing all children and youth artists receiving supports from Philadelphia’s children’s behavioral health community. These talented children and youth who live with mental illness, addiction and intellectual disability are sharing their artistic gifts with us all.

The Opening Celebration is May 2 at 1 p.m. featuring speakers and youth performers. Speakers include:

  • Dr. Arthur C. Evans, Commissioner of DBHIDS
  • Joan Erney, Chief Executive Officer, Community Behavioral Health
  • Denise Taylor Patterson, Director of Intellectual disAbility Services, DBHIDS

The Art Exhibit will run from May 2-10, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Office of Addiction Services

Office of Addiction Services

Philadelphia Prevention Partnership

Philadelphia Prevention Partnership

OAS Recovery Support Services

OAS Recovery Support Services